Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Decision in the case of Manel Pérez Esteve


London, England, 4 February 2014 - The International Tennis Federation announced today that Manel Pérez Esteve has been found to have committed an Anti-Doping Rule Violation under Article 2.1 of the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme (presence of a Prohibited Substance in a player’s sample).
Mr Pérez Esteve, a 19-year-old tennis player from Spain, provided a sample on 14 October 2013 at the F35 Futures event held in El Prat, Spain. That sample was sent to the WADA-accredited laboratory in Montreal, Canada for analysis, and was found to contain terbutaline, a beta-2 agonist. Terbutaline is a Prohibited Substance under the 2013 WADA List of Prohibited Substances and Prohibited Methods, and is therefore also prohibited under the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme. Mr Pérez Esteve was therefore charged with an Anti-Doping Rule Violation under Article 2.1 of the Programme.
Mr Pérez Esteve did not have a valid TUE for the use of terbutaline, but presented evidence that he had been prescribed terbutaline to treat a medical condition. The ITF accepted that Mr Pérez Esteve did not intend to enhance his performance through the use of terbutaline. It is a player’s strict personal duty to ensure that no Prohibited Substance enters his/her body, however as terbutaline is a ‘Specified Substance’ under the 2013 Prohibited List, there is discretion as to the sanction that is applied.
The ITF therefore confirmed Mr Pérez Esteve’s commission of an Anti-Doping Rule Violation under Article 2.1 of the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme, and determined that he be given a reprimand and no period of ineligibility. The ITF also determined that Mr Pérez Esteve’s results achieved at the F35 Futures Event should be disqualified.

13 comments:

  1. A reprimand - as in "Please don't do this again, ok?"

    Yes, the ITF is getting really strict these days!

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  3. World of Tennis 2014, Episode 5: Drug Testing in Tennis
    Sports Illustrated's Jon Wertheim and TENNIS.com editors Peter Bodo, Andrew Friedman, and Tom Perrotta share their views on the sport's doping protocol.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0p4D1pUnOT0

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    1. Perhaps, in a strict sense, off-topic - but: a precious mine for an anthropo-/ sociological study of ethnically-based mentality, "individually"-based role-playing, opportunistic balancing of one's arse between two hot chairs of being too-complying (i.e. boring, and therefore sacked) and being too-outspoken (i.e. disturbing, and therefore sacked), which both extremes will get one's said arse kicked out of it's precious soft, warm environment. All in all, very instructive.

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  4. Offtopic:

    Nadal out from ATP Buenos Aires: back injury AND stomacheache.

    Rafa Nadal ‏@RafaelNadal
    Sorry announcing withdraw from B Aires. Fans & Tournament can’t be better but stomach virus didn't allow practice. http://bit.ly/1fzfukp

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  5. I'm not surprise if Nadal also withdraw atp 500 Rio Open

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  6. The lesson learnt for Perez? Always have a valid TUE in your pocket! Best to be constantly injured, to have a permanent TUE. As a Spanish player, you don't need to look far to find an example…

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  8. Is there a way to know how many players don't have TUE in the top 20? It might be enlightening.

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  9. A prescription from a Spanish "doctor" is meaningless. I am sure they give out backdated prescriptions when their "athletes" get caught.



    Where I think the biggest scandal in all of this is, the Spanish have representatives on WADA. I VERY strongly suspect that the Spanish WADA representatives leak what is being tested for to doping doctors like Cotorro, who design the doping regimes for the "athletes", so as to not get caught. One of these Spanish WADA representatives was Jaime Lissavetzky. He was the biggest defender of Spanish athletes who were caught doping in the previous Socialist government.

    https://wcd.coe.int/ViewDoc.jsp?id=1386329&Site=DC

    http://velonews.competitor.com/2008/08/news/spains-sports-minister-jaime-lissavetzky-said-the-moreno-case-is-an-isolated-breach-of-doping-rules_81579

    http://www.miningmx.com/pls/cms/iac.page?p_t1=1533&p_t2=0&p_t3=0&p_t4=0&p_dynamic=YP&p_content_id=785019&p_site_id=83

    http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2011/Feb/11/zapatero-comes-to-contadors-defense-over-doping/

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    1. This seems like a conflict of interest to me. No?

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  10. This is really outrageous. If guys like Lissavetzky, just a typical Spanish politician, are WADA members, the institution has zero credit to me.

    Spaniard, too, but I tend to believe Pérez Esteve wasn´t doping knowingly. To lose 0-6 1-6 in the first qualifying round of a Futures event...come on.

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  11. Terbutaline is like albuterol... it's generally used by inhalation to treat acute asthma. As PEDs go, pretty feeble. It dilates small airways, but some people have significant number so Beta-2 receptors in cardiac muscle, so it can increase heart rate and contraction in those folks. No anabolic effects, and unlikely to increase endurance. I would guess that up to ~5-10% of athletes could have TUEs for this, as that's the prevalence of asthma.

    My understanding is that, even with a TUE, the concentration is measured, and should we within the levels expected in an individual treated with usual clinical doses........

    So, IMO, another doping "capture" that has little or nothing to do with the real doping that I strongly suspect is going on.

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