Monday, September 19, 2016

Nadal: Then and Now

It's quite amazing how precise athletes get with language when they are caught out on the TUEs (see Wiggins, Bradley)

March 2016: "I have been open all my career...I never tried to hide nothing that I did. I did [platelet-rich plasma], and then I did stem cells. The first time with PRP, it worked fantastic, and the second time it was bad. I had to stop playing tennis for seven months....With stem cells, I used it two times on my knees and it worked very well. I am not doing, never did and never [am] going to do something wrong."

September 19, 2016: "If I have taken anything at any point during my career it was because I asked for and was given permission to do so; under that premise, it is not illegal...Never in my life have I taken anything to enhance my performance. It is simply that doctors granted permission for me to take a product to help my knee."

Friday, September 16, 2016

A bit more insular

From the New York Times:

Stuart Miller, director of the International Tennis Federation’s antidoping program, approved Ms. Mattek-Sands’s applications for exemptions. He said that of the hundreds of applications he had approved in his 10-year tenure at the federation, hers were the only ones overruled by WADA.

Dr. Rogol said DHEA, a precursor of testosterone, should never be approved for use by a female athlete.
“It’s going to be turned, likely, into relatively small doses of testosterone, which of course for a woman, even small doses are performance enhancing,” Dr. Rogol said. “Women’s testosterone levels are normally perhaps a tenth of men’s, so if you boost them up to a fifth or a fourth of men’s, there likely will be an advantage.”

Dr. Rogol called the Court of Arbitration’s expert “spot on” in his reasons for ultimately ruling against Ms. Mattek-Sands.

“I think it tells you that tennis is a little bit more insular,” he said of the federation’s initial approval.